Literary Roundup | September 15-28, 2017

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Have news, events, or opportunities you’d like to see listed here? Email details to info (at) 49writers.org, preferably with “Roundup” as the subject. Items might get edited for length. Your message must be received by close of business the Wednesday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the “Opportunities and Awards” category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email. Thanks! 49 Writers Statewide Roundup appears biweekly, on the first and third Friday of each month. If your short-notice event occurs between a missed deadline and an upcoming Roundup, email us a heads up anyway, and if we can help spread the word in other ways, we will.  

 EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

We’re putting together our upcoming season of workshops, classes, Reading & Craft Talk Series and Crosscurrents events, and special events. Registration will open soon for classes in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Seward!

Thanks to everyone who came out to see Louise Erdrich in Anchorage and Homer, and to the wonderful group of writers who participated in this year’s Tutka Bay Writers Retreat, led by Erdrich.

Alaska Quarterly Review will try out an online submissions platform for the first time ever as a trial run. Learn more.

SOUTHCENTRAL

HOMER | Nancy Lord presents her latest book, the novel pH, at the Homer Public Library, September 15, 2017 at 6 pm. Refreshments from Two Sisters!

KODIAK | Nancy Lord appears at the Kodiak Public Library at 6:30 PM, September 18, 2017

ANCHORAGE | Poetry Parley kicks off a new season, Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 7 pm, with readings from area poets including, Eric Johnson, Linda Lucky, Tonja Woelber, Sandra Kleven, Mary Beth Holleman, Susan Niman, Marilyn Borell, Karen Tschannen, Dawnell Smith, Dwayne Cole, and Mary Kancewick. This event will be hosted by Tonja Woelber. Email poetryparley@gmail.com for the address. Also, send a note if you would like to read as a few spaces are still available.

ANCHORAGE | Book signing by Rick Kullberg, author of Troll Tale: A Saga of Two Young Girls, on Saturday, September 23, 2017 book at 2 Friends Gallery, 341 E. Benson Blvd., Anchorage; 1-3 pm. Book Description: The prophecy of a Norse shaman sends two young girls, one of whom is a troll, on a saga that takes them across the frozen lands of Scandinavia, out to sea in the North Atlantic, and deep into the spirit worlds of the Inuit and the Vikings. Relying on their friendship, wits and help from unexpected allies, the children face adventures that challenge their very survival. Troll Tale is a book for all ages, nonviolent but packed with adventure. It is a large format, museum quality hardcover book with 47 illustrations. The author is a 40-year resident of Anchorage and Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

ANCHORAGE | Saturday, September 23 at 1 pm
Doug Vandegraft presents More Notorious Bars of Alaska | Based on Doug Vandegraft’s 14 years of research, A Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska details the rich history and atmosphere of noteworthy Alaskan bars. Several of the bars featured have been around since the end of Prohibition in 1933, and have gained legendary repute in their communities and beyond. Doug Vandegraft has worked as a Cartographer for the Department of the Interior since 1983. He began his notorious bars of Alaska project in 1999, while still living in Anchorage. A Guide to the Notorious Bars of Alaska is published by Epicenter Press. A revised second edition of the guide will soon be released. Doug will give a presentation about the latest edition of the book, including a summary of the notorious bars that have closed since the first edition, and the bars that have been added to the second edition. Everyone is invited to come and share laughs and stories. Free parking at UAA on Saturdays.

ANCHORAGE | October 3, 2017 at 6 PM, Cynosure Brewing Co. Nancy Lord will share passages from her new book, pH: A Novel, and talk about oceans and the environment in this outreach event hosted by Trustees for Alaska. Snacks, beverages and books available. Facebook event.

ANCHORAGE | October 4, 2017 at 5 PM, Nancy Lord, author of the new novel pH, joins acidification scientist Darcy Dugan for a science-focused event featuring a reading and conversation.

ANCHORAGE | October 25, 2017 at 7 PM, Nancy Lord will present a 49 Writers Reading & Craft Talk Series event. Details TBA.

INTERIOR 

FAIRBANKS | Pioneer Park Theater, Friday, September 22, 2017, 7 pm | Meanwhile, in Alaskaland… A Live Alaskan Storytelling Event and Fundraiser presents Animal Tales to support Loving Companions Animal Rescue, Inc. Happy Hour/Silent Auction starts at 6 pm. Storytellers wanted. email colleen@withheartproductions.com for details.

SOUTHEAST

JUNEAU | September 15, 2017, 6:30 PM sign ups, 7 PM start. Open Mic at Zach Gordon Youth Center.

HAINES | Haines Public Library will welcome author, explorer, and mycologist Lawrence Millman to Haines. Millman will share a reading from his latest book At the End of the World: A True Story of Murder in the Arctic on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 6 PM at the Haines Library. Then on Wednesday, he will lead an interpretive mushroom walk starting at Battery Point Trailhead at 1:00 PM. That evening Millman will share his multimedia presentation on Traditional Uses of Fungi at the Library at 6 PM. Sponsored by Shorefast Editions, Babbling Book, Friends of the Library and the Haines Borough Public Library.

JUNEAU | Friday, September 29 at Andrew P. Kashevaroff Building at 395 Whittier Street.
49 Writers, Inc., in partnership with NEA Big Read, Juneau Public Libraries, Friends of JPL, the Alaska State Library and Museum, and the Friends of the Alaska State Library and Museum, kickoff a series of Big Read programs. 5-5:30: refreshments by the Friends of the Alaska State Library and Museum. 5:30pm: 49 Writers presents a Crosscurrents Keynote event:

Living and Creating in the Aftermath
In this NEA Big Read keynote event, playwright Vera Starbard, poet Joan Naviyuk Kane, and novelist Don Rearden discuss the power of art in a colonized, indigenous Alaska.Through an examination of their own work and the Big Read selection, Station Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel, the panel will discuss the notion that “survival is insufficient” in the wake of widespread cultural and social upheaval. Their live onstage conversation will precede a Q and A session and book signing.

JUNEAU | Saturday, September 30, 2017 | A morning 49 Writers writing workshop led by Don Rearden and an afternoon poetry workshop led by Joan Naviyuk Kane will be held in the APK Building classroom at 395 Whittier Street. Registration details and more to be announced soon.

WRANGELL | Flying Island Writers & Artists group meets every other Monday 6:30-8:00 pm. Contact Vivian Faith Prescott for more information doctorviv@yahoo.com

 

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CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

2017 Conference for Writers and Illustrators, a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and Romance Writers of America, begins Saturday, September 16 at the BP Energy + Conference Center in Anchorage, Alaska for an all-day event of keynotes and panels, as well as tracks specifically designed for writing craft, author marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, romance, children’s literature, memoir, and nonfiction. Optional intensives and roundtable critiques are also available all day Friday, September 15. More

The Northern Pen Conference of Prose and Music is coming up October 12-15, 2017. It helps young writers and composers hone their crafts, develop as collaborative artists, and understand how they fit into the communities and natural environments that inspire them. The primary activity of the conference will be the creation of new works of prose and music. Students will enjoy time dedicated to writing in the beautiful natural environment surrounding the conference center. They will benefit from the personalized feedback of award-winning author Matthew Dickerson and composer Michael Dickerson, and they will gain new skills and perspectives through interactive workshops led by interdisciplinary artist Hollis Mickey. Finally, they will have opportunities to present their work during the conference in collaboration with their peers, as well as after the conference in radio broadcasts, museum performances, and gallery presentations. The Northern Pen will give young artists support as they define and realize their artistic visions. The conference center is nestled in the Matanuska Valley between the Chugach and Talkeetna Mountains, just ten minutes away from the spectacular Matanuska Glacier. There will be various activities and excursions to take advantage of the beautiful surrounding wilderness. Learn more.


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

Alaska Book Week will be October 1-7, 2017. Authors interested in participating are encouraged to contact Elizabeth Waetjen at akbookweek@gmail.com.

September 30, 2017 is the deadline to apply for a 2018 artist residency at Denali National Park. Visual artists, writers, and composers are eligible.

What’s missing? Submit your event or announcement to appear in the next Roundup. Send an email with “Roundup” as the subject to info@49Writers.org. 

Thank You for Your Support! 49 Writers members and donors make this blog, our workshops, Crosscurrents events, Readings and Craft Talk series, and other special programs and activities possible. Not a member yet? Join Us 

49 Writers, Inc. is supported, in part, by a grant from the Alaska State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Deb Vanasse | What’s Your Misbelief?

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One thing that can be easily said about writing—there’s no shortage of resources to help writers hone their craft.

In general, that’s a good thing. But this abundance also adds to confusion as writers try out different rules and formulae, determining in one way or another that there are “have-tos” involved in this enterprise. There’s your archetypal approach—hero, mentor, guardian, shapeshifter. There’s your thirty days to Name Your Goal—mystery, memoir, bestseller. Thirty chapters in thirty days. Thirty books in thirty days. (No, I’m not making that up. It’s real “craft” title.)

Writing by the numbers has a way of making your writing stale, of leaching the excitement of discovery from the process. Yet there are tips and tricks that can help to frame your thinking about a project.

One of the best of these is Lisa Cron’s concept of building stories around a character’s misbelief. I met Lisa when we were both on faculty at a writer’s conference a few years ago. She takes a smart psychological approach to story. Lately, I’ve recommended to several editorial clients her Story Genius, in which she details ways to structure stories around character misbeliefs.

Internalized misbeliefs are helpful in framing stories because they’re universal. We all acquire them as we mature, and we often cling to them without realizing the havoc they wreak in our lives. Misbeliefs also have origin stories. From a writer’s perspective, these origin stories help decide which aspects of backstory are vital to the narrative. In the misbelief, there’s also inherent tension, struggle, and the potential to overcome.

But don’t take my word for it. Check out Lisa’s book and read for yourself.

Deb Vanasse is the author of seventeen books with six different publishers. Among the most recent are Write Your Best Book, a practical guide to writing books that rise above the rest; Cold Spell, a novel that “captures the harsh beauty of the terrain as well as the strain of self-doubt and complicated family bonds; and the “deeply researched and richly imagined” biography  Wealth Woman. After thirty-six years in Alaska, she now lives on the north coast of Oregon, where she continues to write while doing freelance editing, coaching, and writing instruction.

Literary Roundup | September 1-14, 2017

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Have news, events, or opportunities you’d like to see listed here? Email details to info (at) 49writers.org, preferably with “Roundup” as the subject. Items might get edited for length. Your message must be received by close of business the Wednesday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the “Opportunities and Awards” category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email. Thanks! 49 Writers Statewide Roundup appears biweekly, on the first and third Friday of each month. If your short-notice event occurs between a missed deadline and an upcoming Roundup, email us a heads up anyway, and if we can help spread the word in other ways, we will.  

 EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

We’re putting together our upcoming season of workshops, classes, Reading & Craft Talk Series and Crosscurrents events, and special events. Stay tuned!

The Library of Congress has selected Sealaska Heritage Institute’s Baby Raven Reads literacy program for its 2017 Best Practice Honoree award, making it one of only 15 programs in the world to receive the honor this year. The Library of Congress Literacy Awards honor organizations that have made outstanding contributions to increasing literacy in the United States or abroad and encourage the continuing development of innovative methods for promoting literacy and the wide dissemination of the most effective practices. The program was founded by philanthropist David M. Rubenstein in 2013. In an award letter, the Library of Congress noted SHI’s success in applying research-validated practices to promote literacy through its Baby Raven Reads program. The letter also said that Baby Raven Reads “serves as a valuable model for other organizations seeking to create evidence-based literacy programs.” The award comes with a $5,000 prize, which will be given at a ceremony at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. this fall.

SOUTHCENTRAL

Louise Erdrich ~ public readings in Anchorage and Homer, plus a reception in Anchorage
ANCHORAGE | September 6th, 2017, Wendy Williamson Auditorium, 7 pm | 49 Writers, Inc. is pleased to present acclaimed novelist Louise Erdrich in Anchorage for a free public reading. Everyone is encouraged to attend.  The free public reading is scheduled for UAA’s Wendy Williamson Auditorium from 7:00 – 9:00 PM. No tickets needed. | A private ticketed reception for Louise with 49 Writers members and supporters will precede the reading, and will take place backstage at the Wendy Williamson from 5:00 – 6:30 PM. A limited number of tickets for that reception can be purchased online now at http://49writers.org/louise-erdrich-event. Tickets are $30/person for 49 Writers members, and non-members can purchase or renew membership for an additional $49. All tickets will be will-call at Wendy Williamson beginning at 5:00 PM the day of the event. UAA Bookstore staff will be on site with books for sale, and Joan Naviyuk Kane will be introducing Louise Erdrich.

HOMER | Louise Erdrich will also offer a free public reading in Homer on Thursday, September 7th, 6:30 PM at Kenai Peninsula College’s Kachemak Bay Campus.

Louise Erdrich grew up in North Dakota and is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe. She is German, French, and Anishinaabe. Her first book, Love Medicine, received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as did her latest novel, LaRose. Her book The Round House, a crime novel about a boy who tries to protect his mother, a victim of sexual violence on an Ojibwe reservation, won the National Book Award. She wrote about the German side of her family in The Master Butcher’s Singing Club. Louise has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist, received many other honors including the Library of Congress Award, and she owns a small independent bookstore, Birchbark Books, in Minneapolis. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters

Erdrich’s appearances come in advance of the 8th Annual 49 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat, led this year by Erdrich.

ANCHORAGE | Thursday, September 7 from 5 – 7:00 pm, UAA Campus Bookstore | Author Heather Lende discusses The Local and Community in Small Town Alaska Politics | Heather Lende is a dedicated member of the Haines community and serves on the Haines Borough Assembly. Since 1996, she regularly posts obituaries and a social column for the Chilkat Valley News. Her nationally acclaimed books include If You Lived Here, I’d Know Your Name (2006), Take Good Care of the Garden and Dogs (2011), and Find The Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-town Obituary Writer (2015). A graduate from Middlebury College, Heather Lende earned a MFA degree from UAA.

ANCHORAGE | Monday, September 11 from 5 – 7:00 pm, UAA Campus BookstoreDr. Sharon Emmerichs presents The Kingdom of Our Own Language: Language as Space and Nation in Shakespeare | Dr. Sharon Emmerichs teaches Shakespeare in the UAA English Dept. Her published research examines the role of landscape in Shakespeare’s plays—how and when characters suffer moral degradation when they transgress the culturally known and accepted meanings of various landscapes. At this event, the relationship between national identity and language in Shakespeare will be addressed.  Everyone is welcomed to attend. Dr. Sharon Emmerichs received her B.A. in English literature from the University of Oregon and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Missouri.

 

ANCHORAGE | Thursday, September 14 from 5 pm – 7:00 pm at UAA Campus Bookstore | Darrel Hess presents “Leave It To Beaver, Cocaine & God: My Journey to Community Engagement” ~ In Leave It To Beaver, Cocaine & God: My Journey to Community Engagement, Darrel Hess talks about growing up in the shadow of domestic violence, his arrest for selling cocaine to an undercover Alaska State Trooper, coming to terms with his sexual orientation, his relationship with God, and his struggles to find himself and his place in the world. Today, Darrel Hess works as Anchorage’s Municipal Ombudsman and is a member of the Advisory Council for UAA’s Center for Community Engagement and Learning. A pillar in the Anchorage community, Darrel Hess has served as Anchorage’s first Homeless Coordinator and was a member of the Anchorage Equal Rights Commission. He has served on the board of Identity, Inc. and is the recipient of the 2014 Alaska First Lady’s Volunteer of the Year Award. All UAA Campus Bookstore events are free and open to the public. There is free parking for events in the South Lot, Sports Complex NW Lot, West Campus Central Lot, and Sports Campus West Lot.

 

INTERIOR 

FAIRBANKS | Pioneer Park Theater, Friday, September 22, 2017, 7 pm | Meanwhile, in Alaskaland… A Live Alaskan Storytelling Event and Fundraiser presents Animal Tales to support Loving Companions Animal Rescue, Inc. Happy Hour/Silent Auction starts at 6 pm. Storytellers wanted. email colleen@withheartproductions.com for details.

 

SOUTHEAST

JUNEAU | Friday, September 8 at the Walter Soboleff Building | Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) has published four new culturally-based children’s books that reflect the Native worldview. The new series includes the ancient story Shanyáak’utlaax: Salmon Boy; and the original texts Let’s Go: A Harvest Story; Picking Berries; and Native Values: Living in Harmony. The books were illustrated by Tlingit artist Michaela Goade and Tsimshian artist David Lang. Authors include Hannah Lindoff (with Marigold Lindoff) and Rosita Worl. The text of Shanyáak’utlaax: Salmon Boy was edited by Johnny Marks, Hans Chester, David Katzeek, Nora Dauenhauer, and Richard Dauenhauer. More info

WRANGELL | Flying Island Writers & Artists group meets every other Monday 6:30-8:00 pm. Contact Vivian Faith Prescott for more information doctorviv@yahoo.com

 

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CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

2017 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat with Louise Erdrich will occur September 10-12, 2017. Application period is closed. More. See above for details on public appearances in ANC and Homer.

2017 Conference for Writers and Illustrators, a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and Romance Writers of America, begins Saturday, September 16 at the BP Energy + Conference Center in Anchorage, Alaska for an all-day event of keynotes and panels, as well as tracks specifically designed for writing craft, author marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, romance, children’s literature, memoir, and nonfiction. Optional intensives and roundtable critiques are also available all day Friday, September 15. More

The Northern Pen Conference of Prose and Music is coming up October 12-15, 2017. It helps young writers and composers hone their crafts, develop as collaborative artists, and understand how they fit into the communities and natural environments that inspire them. The primary activity of the conference will be the creation of new works of prose and music. Students will enjoy time dedicated to writing in the beautiful natural environment surrounding the conference center. They will benefit from the personalized feedback of award-winning author Matthew Dickerson and composer Michael Dickerson, and they will gain new skills and perspectives through interactive workshops led by interdisciplinary artist Hollis Mickey. Finally, they will have opportunities to present their work during the conference in collaboration with their peers, as well as after the conference in radio broadcasts, museum performances, and gallery presentations. The Northern Pen will give young artists support as they define and realize their artistic visions. The conference center is nestled in the Matanuska Valley between the Chugach and Talkeetna Mountains, just ten minutes away from the spectacular Matanuska Glacier. There will be various activities and excursions to take advantage of the beautiful surrounding wilderness. Learn more.


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Alaska Arts & Culture Foundation present The Alaska Literary Awards, established in 2014 through a generous gift from Peggy Shumaker and Joe Usibelli. The awards recognize and support writers of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting, screenwriting, and mixed genres. Any Alaska writer over the age of 18 who is not a full-time student is eligible to apply. Quality of the work submitted is the primary consideration in determining who receives the awards. There are no restrictions on the writer’s use of the award and no formal report is required. A select number of $5,000 awards will be awarded annually. The Application Deadline is Friday, September 1, 2017 at 9:59 p.m. AKDT. Learn more and apply here.

Alaska Humanities Forum launches new social practice grant, called HUMAN:ties, offering $10,000 to activate the imaginations of creators statewide to build an advocacy project that defines and illuminates the fabric of homelessness in our state. The application for this grant opportunity is now open and available to all Alaskans. Please visit www.akhf.org/humanties-grants for more information on the invitation and the grant application itself. ELIGIBILITY: 1. Anyone can define themselves as a “creator”. You do not need to be an “artist” as it’s conventionally defined. No portfolio or formal training necessary. You just need to be able to describe a vision of a project that illuminates the features of homelessness and reaches homeless populations. 2. All creative disciplines… including the literary arts… are eligible. More info here.

Alaska Book Week will be October 1-7, 2017. Authors interested in participating are encouraged to contact Elizabeth Waetjen at akbookweek@gmail.com.

September 30, 2017 is the deadline to apply for a 2018 artist residency at Denali National Park. Visual artists, writers, and composers are eligible.

What’s missing? Submit your event or announcement to appear in the next Roundup. Send an email with “Roundup” as the subject to info@49Writers.org. 


Thank You for Your Support! 49 Writers members and donors make this blog, our workshops, Crosscurrents events, Readings and Craft Talk series, and other special programs and activities possible. Not a member yet? Join Us 

49 Writers, Inc. is supported, in part, by a grant from the Alaska State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Active Voice: Writers Respond | Erin Coughlin Hollowell

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As summer turns to winter in Alaska, with a brief interlude long enough to weigh three-quarter ton pumpkins in Palmer that some might call fall, we are excited to announce the return of the blog series Active Voice: Writers Respond, a forum for Alaska writers to respond to current events and controversies on the national stage.

And what a summer it’s been—from the nail biter of a 49-51 vote in Congress over healthcare reform which turned on the opposition of Alaska’s senior senator, to the recent white supremacist rally and tragic death in Charlottesville, Virginia, national news has been packed with issues and events that surprise, divide, shock, and sadden all of us, no matter what your background or political philosophy. When we embarked on this project several months ago at 49 Writers, we never thought we would be contemplating the role of writers in a country where a man called “The Mooch” could be the director of communications for the commander-in-chief, even ever so briefly.

This week, we turn to a story that puts an Alaska twist on the old adage “all politics is local.” Shortly after the national controversy about sanctuary cities raged in places like Chicago and Boston, the immigration debate pitted neighbor against neighbor in one of the most unlikely of places: Homer, Alaska. Three city council members found themselves facing a recall election over a resolution they said was about inclusivity and tolerance, but which recall petitioners said was “anti-Trump” in nature and would turn Homer into a sanctuary city. I won’t attempt to sort out exactly what happened during the recall election here—as Homer poet Erin Coughlin Hollowell recounts in her essay below, “It started because it started, and then it just kept going.”

The debate over the recall effort grew so heated that it even drew national attention, including coverage from NPR’s “This American Life.” While the election ended in June, the ripple effects of the campaign remain in the quiet fishing town at the end of the road that is home to so many talented Alaska writers.

In the piece that follows, Hollowell recounts how she found herself in an unexpected position during the election—running the Facebook page for the No Recall PAC in Homer. The role gave her a front-row seat to see how some of her neighbors expressed themselves behind the relative anonymity of the Internet. Read on to find out how the experience changed how she looks at her community, and at her own role within it as a writer.

Do you live in Homer, or were you impacted by the recall election? Share your experience in the comments!

~ Charles Boyle
Active Voice Editor
49 Writers, Inc. 


Erin Coughlin Hollowell | Active Voice: Writers Respond 

It started because someone wanted to push back on anti-immigrant rhetoric. It started because someone’s wife was increasingly subjected to racist remarks. It started because Alaska has always been a place where people with strong opinions live. It started because someone thought that someone else was disrespecting the President. It started because it was that long slow end of winter in a small town. It started because people felt like they weren’t being heard. It started because it started, and then it just kept going.

I’m not going to recap the bitter ideological fissure that opened up in Homer this year. I wouldn’t be able to be unbiased. Even though I don’t live within the city limits, even though I can’t vote for city council members, I listen to their meetings and I count many of them among my friends. What happens in Homer impacts me because when I go into town, that’s the town I go into. I work in Homer. I use the library, shop at the stores, visit friends, go to the Farmer’s Market, walk on the beaches. When one faction of the town began to actively attempt to recall city council members who didn’t align with their beliefs, that affected me.

On a day so sunny that I had to squint into the cold wind, I ran into one of the city council members who was one of the subjects of the ire. This is a woman whom I admire because she does her homework, reads the giant tome of information for each council meeting, tallies columns, asks good questions. She was visibly shaken. At the end of the last city council meeting, a member of the public had basically shouted at her, pointing a finger, and declaring her a liar.

The rhetoric on both sides rapidly escalated. On internet forums, there were posts that fanned the flames. Everyone was feeling righteously indignant. Political Action Committees were formed. Schisms grew. Friends started to see each other on opposite sides of the matter. Bad information was slung about with increased fervor. It was possible to remain neutral, but only if you didn’t know the city council members. It was possible to remain neutral, but only if you consciously decided to and didn’t come into town.

I wasn’t neutral. When the No-Recall PAC was formed, I went to the first meeting. I didn’t want to be a leader, but I wanted to help. I felt as someone who didn’t live within the city limits, it would be inappropriate for me to be a spokesperson or leader. But, I personally knew that several of the people who were up for recall were good citizens, members of our community concerned with fairness, equity, inclusivity. In my heart, it was hard to argue with inclusivity. By the end of the meeting, I’d agreed to run the PAC’s Facebook Page, mostly because no one else knew how to do it. I didn’t have any idea how this would color the way I looked at my town.

Facebook Pages are, by nature, faceless entities. No one knew that I was the person behind the page. I made up my mind that there would be no censorship unless comments were factually incorrect or libelous. I hadn’t even considered the “back-channel” messages when I volunteered. They began to trickle in, a few each day. Some were pointed questions, some badgering, but some were entirely something else. They were frightening. I responded to most with the same message, “Thank you for your response. America is built on freedom of thought and the ability to respectfully disagree. Have a nice day.” I simply copied and pasted and sent, then deleted the originating messages. I didn’t share them with the PAC or the city council members. It didn’t seem productive to do so.

But how do you respond to the message, “I hope if the recall fails, Muslims will come to town and murder your children”? After this particular gem, I began to look at people on the street more closely. Remember, I knew the names of the people sending these messages. They weren’t in my personal circle of acquaintances, but many lived in town or nearby. I could run into them in the Safeway parking lot. Not all of the messages were this ugly, but enough of them were that it made me unsure of what kind of hatred lurked just beneath the veneer of civility.

I tried to understand. I grew up in a very politically conservative household. At times in my life, I’ve been so poorly paid that I ate eggs and white rice for days on end before my next paycheck came. I’ve worked in inner cities as a teacher and at Goldman Sachs investment bank (in document processing, not as a banker, but still). I’ve lived in every quadrant of the United States, in big cities and small towns. I tried to understand so that I could continue to live in this beautiful place that I call home.

The Recall Election was in June. The proposition failed, and the city council stands intact. Following the election, I closed down the Facebook page with a sigh of relief. I spend more time in my garden then I do in town. I pay close attention to the way the fireweed moves up the stem.

What happened in Homer represents in microcosm what is happening everywhere in the United States. Polarization. Fence-building. Ugly rhetoric lobbed at digital avatars behind which are real people. Community members struggling to find the things that used to bind them. I write about foxgloves. Tides. Glacier light. I’m not sure what my role is bridging the political divide with my writing. I think my job is to remind people to look up, open up. It’s hard to hold onto hatred while watching whales breach in Kachemak Bay. It’s hard to be angry during the zucchini races at the Farmer’s Market.

All around us now, autumn is poking its sly nose into the fields. The pushki weed has crowned and sets seeds. Fields of purple blossoms will someday soon subside into a mist of smoke. There are mushrooms in the woods and the elderberries are providing a feast for the birds whose chorus is noticeably less enthusiastic than it was a month ago. One day, too soon, the ragged call of the sandhill cranes will trail overhead as they leave this place.

But I’ll be here, listening. I’ll still be trying to understand.

Erin Coughlin Hollowell published her first poetry collection Pause, Traveler in 2013, and her second collection Every Atom will be available in April 2018. She has been awarded two Rasmuson Foundation Fellowships, a Connie Boochever Award, and an Alaska Literary Award. She teaches for the University of Alaska Anchorage Low-Residency MFA Program and as an adjunct for the Kachemak Bay Campus. She is a core faculty member of the Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference and is executive director of Storyknife Writers Retreat. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Oliver | Still Breathing

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“Still Breathing”, a poem written by the Australasian poet Stephen Oliver, commemorates Derick Burleson, the Alaskan poet who died on December 29, 2016. Oliver reads the poem in this video presentation. “Still Breathing” was first read at Derick’s memorial by his spouse, Nicole Sprague, on April 1, 2017 in Fairbanks, Alaska.

You can also read Derick Burleson’s obituary in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner here.

Stephen Oliver – Australasian poet / voice artist and author of 18 volumes of poetry. Lived in Australia for 20 years. Now NZ. Signed on with the radio ship The Voice of Peace broadcasting in the Mediterranean out of Jaffa, Israel in the late 70s. Free-lanced as production voice, narratornewsreader, radio producer, columnist, copy and feature writer, etc. He has published widely in international literary journals and anthologies. Regular contributor of creative non-fiction and poems to Antipodes: A Global Journal of Australian and New Zealand Literature. Poems translated into German, Spanish, Chinese, and Russian. Oliver’s poem cycle Deadly Pollen, Word Riot Press, USA (2003) translated into Spanish (Polen Mortal) by the Chilean poet, Sergio Badilla Castillo and first published in Nagari (Vol 7 2015). Represented in: Writing To The Wire Anthology, edited by Dan Disney and Kit Kelen, University of Western Australia Publishing 2016; Manifesto: A Political Anthology, edited by Emma Neale and Philip Temple, Otago University Press, 2017. Newly released: GONE: Satirical Poems: New & Selected, Greywacke Press, Canberra, 2016

Literary Roundup | August 18-31, 2017

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Have news, events, or opportunities you’d like to see listed here? Email details to info (at) 49writers.org, preferably with “Roundup” as the subject. Items might get edited for length. Your message must be received by close of business the Wednesday before the roundup is scheduled to run at the latest. Unless your event falls in the “Opportunities and Awards” category, it should occur no more than 30 days from when we receive your email. Thanks! 49 Writers Statewide Roundup appears biweekly, on the first and third Friday of each month. If your short-notice event occurs between a missed deadline and an upcoming Roundup, email us a heads up anyway, and if we can help spread the word in other ways, we will.  

 EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

We’re putting together our upcoming season of workshops, classes, Reading & Craft Talk Series and Crosscurrents events, and special events. Stay tuned.

SOUTHCENTRAL

Cross Road: There is No Planet B | An art installation about climate change at Side Street Espresso features a series of events during the exhibition. Enjoy music by Libby Roderick and readings by Alaska Native poets Joan Naviyuk Kane, Priscilla Hensley, Carrie Ojanen on Saturday, August 19, 2017 from 1-2:30 pm.   
Louise Erdrich ~ public readings in Anchorage and Homer, plus a reception in Anchorage
SEPT 6th, 2017, Wendy Williamson Auditorium, 7 pm | 49 Writers, Inc. is pleased to present acclaimed novelist Louise Erdrich in Anchorage for a free public reading. Everyone is encouraged to attend.  The free public reading is scheduled for UAA’s Wendy Williamson Auditorium from 7:00 – 9:00 PM in lieu of the private reception initially planned for the same time at 49th State Brewing Company. A private ticketed reception will still be held for 49 Writers members and supporters, and will take place backstage at the Wendy Williamson from 5:00 – 6:30 PM. A limited number of tickets for that reception can be purchased online now at http://49writers.org/louise-erdrich-event. Tickets are $30/person for 49 Writers members, and non-members can purchase or renew membership for an additional $49. All tickets will be will-call at Wendy Williamson beginning at 5:00 PM the day of the event. UAA Bookstore staff will be on site with books for sale, and Joan Naviyuk Kane will be introducing Louise Erdrich.

Erdrich will also offer a free public reading in Homer on Thursday, September 7th, 6:30 PM at Kenai Peninsula College’s Kachemak Bay Campus.

Louise Erdrich grew up in North Dakota and is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe. She is German, French, and Anishinaabe. Her first book, Love Medicine, received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as did her latest novel, LaRose. Her book The Round House, a crime novel about a boy who tries to protect his mother, a victim of sexual violence on an Ojibwe reservation, won the National Book Award. She wrote about the German side of her family in The Master Butcher’s Singing Club. Louise has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist, received many other honors including the Library of Congress Award, and she owns a small independent bookstore, Birchbark Books, in Minneapolis. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters.

Erdrich’s appearances come in advance of the 8th Annual 49 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat, led this year by Erdrich.

INTERIOR 

SOUTHEAST

WRANGELL | Flying Island Writers & Artists group meets every other Monday 6:30-8:00 pm. Contact Vivian Faith Prescott for more information doctorviv@yahoo.com

SOUTHWEST

NA

ARCTIC 

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CONFERENCES, RETREATS, and RESIDENCIES

The Northern Pen Conference of Prose and Music is coming up October 12-15, 2017. It helps young writers and composers hone their crafts, develop as collaborative artists, and understand how they fit into the communities and natural environments that inspire them. The primary activity of the conference will be the creation of new works of prose and music. Students will enjoy time dedicated to writing in the beautiful natural environment surrounding the conference center. They will benefit from the personalized feedback of award-winning author Matthew Dickerson and composer Michael Dickerson, and they will gain new skills and perspectives through interactive workshops led by interdisciplinary artist Hollis Mickey. Finally, they will have opportunities to present their work during the conference in collaboration with their peers, as well as after the conference in radio broadcasts, museum performances, and gallery presentations. The Northern Pen will give young artists support as they define and realize their artistic visions. The conference center is nestled in the Matanuska Valley between the Chugach and Talkeetna Mountains, just ten minutes away from the spectacular Matanuska Glacier. There will be various activities and excursions to take advantage of the beautiful surrounding wilderness. Learn more.

2017 Writers Tutka Bay Writers Retreat with Louise Erdrich will occur September 10-12, 2017. Application period is closed. More.

2017 Conference for Writers and Illustrators, a partnership between Alaska Writers Guild, the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and Romance Writers of America, begins Saturday, September 16 at the BP Energy + Conference Center in Anchorage, Alaska for an all-day event of keynotes and panels, as well as tracks specifically designed for writing craft, author marketing, traditional publishing, self publishing, romance, children’s literature, memoir, and nonfiction. Optional intensives and roundtable critiques are also available all day Friday, September 15. More


OPPORTUNITIES and AWARDS for WRITERS

Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Alaska Arts & Culture Foundation present The Alaska Literary Awards, established in 2014 through a generous gift from Peggy Shumaker and Joe Usibelli. The awards recognize and support writers of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting, screenwriting, and mixed genres. Any Alaska writer over the age of 18 who is not a full-time student is eligible to apply. Quality of the work submitted is the primary consideration in determining who receives the awards. There are no restrictions on the writer’s use of the award and no formal report is required. A select number of $5,000 awards will be awarded annually. The Application Deadline is Friday, September 1, 2017 at 9:59 p.m. AKDT. Learn more and apply here.

Alaska Humanities Forum launches new social practice grant, called HUMAN:ties, offering $10,000 to activate the imaginations of creators statewide to build an advocacy project that defines and illuminates the fabric of homelessness in our state. The application for this grant opportunity is now open and available to all Alaskans. Please visit www.akhf.org/humanties-grants for more information on the invitation and the grant application itself. ELIGIBILITY: 1. Anyone can define themselves as a “creator”. You do not need to be an “artist” as it’s conventionally defined. No portfolio or formal training necessary. You just need to be able to describe a vision of a project that illuminates the features of homelessness and reaches homeless populations. 2. All creative disciplines… including the literary arts… are eligible. More info here.

Alaska Book Week will be October 1-7, 2017. Authors interested in participating are encouraged to contact Elizabeth Waetjen at akbookweek@gmail.com.

September 30, 2017 is the deadline to apply for a 2018 artist residency at Denali National Park. Visual artists, writers, and composers are eligible.

What’s missing? Submit your event or announcement to appear in the next Roundup. Send an email with “Roundup” as the subject to info@49Writers.org. 


Thank You for Your Support! 49 Writers members and donors make this blog, our workshops, Crosscurrents events, Readings and Craft Talk series, and other special programs and activities possible. Not a member yet? Join Us 

Amy O’Neill Houck | Practice Makes Pages: David Sedaris and John Straley on Making a Habit of Writing

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On Mother’s Day, David Sedaris made a sold-out appearance in the 900 seat house at Juneau Douglas High School. A humorist—a writer—filling the biggest house we have in our small town in Alaska was somehow reassuring. After reading for about an hour, mostly funny, some overtly political (he was in a friendly crowd), and a few poignant pieces, he turned to his newest work. It’s excerpts from his diaries. He has selected snippets and arranged them into a couple of chronological volumes. The first came out this year, and is called Theft by Finding: the diaries 1977-2002.

At the end of the reading, he left time for questions. He called on a woman who asked about how he goes about journaling. Sedaris held up his hands about 18 inches apart and said, “I write about this much each day. He then moved them about three inches apart and said, and maybe “this much” each week becomes usable. (His new book covers a 23-year span, so this math probably works out.) Notably, Sedaris said that his diaries are not places for interior self-examination. “I almost never write about feelings.” When it comes down to writing his essays, his diaries are a gold mine, not because he’s worked out a thought process, or examined his own mind. They are valuable because he recorded his memory of a very recent experience nearly in the moment. It’s his most reliable record. It must also be his way of practicing the curation of his funny way of seeing the world. He records dialog and things that happened with his family or in his daily life. Later, he has the raw ingredients to cook up something hilarious, as in this scene from Me Talk Pretty One Day, where Sedaris tries to explain Easter to some non-Christian students in his beginning French class in Paris.

I knew the word, so I raised my hand, saying, “The rabbit of Easter. He bring of the chocolate.”

“A rabbit?” The teacher, assuming I’d used the wrong word, positioned her index fingers on top of her head, wriggling them as though they were ears. “You mean one of these? A rabbit rabbit?”

“Well, sure,” I said. “He come in the night when one sleep on bed. Which a hand he have a basket and foods.”

The teacher sighed and shook her head. As far as she was concerned, I had just explained everything wrong with my country. “No, no,” she said. “Here in France the chocolate is brought by a big bell that flies in from Rome.”

I called for a time-out. “But how do the bell know where you live?”

“Well,” she said, “how does a rabbit?”

I’ve rarely considered my journals anything more than a place to clear cobwebs and get down things that might get in the way of writing projects. It’s like stretching before a run, I guess—I’m not a runner. And I stink at doing the same thing every day. But after seeing Sedaris, I thought again about that practice, and the possibility of giving it more intention. Practice seeing, remembering, and making good sentences, practice remembering moments and things that people say. In this way, writing practice is more like practicing the violin than like preparing for strenuous exercise.

This June, at the North Words Writers Symposium in Skagway, John Straley gave a workshop. He has just released a book of haiku: 100 Poems of Spring. It’s the first of four volumes, one for each of the four seasons. The book includes illustrations by Norm Campbell, but the art complements rather than actually illustrating the poetry. It’s a lovely visual rest between words. The whole book is as much exhale as inhale, with lots of pages to breathe between small poems like:

Above rounded hips
Aurora Borealis
Like satin sheets

The workshop was about haiku, and Straley included some practical advice about the form. (Haiku should place itself within a season, have a sense of wonder.) John also spoke about the genesis of his new book. Haiku is part of his daily writing practice. He said coming to the page can be a struggle, and his daily practice is carefully prescribed, that way he never approaches a blank page wondering what he’s going to do. Before he starts work on his novels or other writing, he begins the day in his journal, and he always does it the same way. He starts by writing out the whole date, the place where he is at that moment, the weather, “Why am I here?” some “Dear Diary crap,” he lets himself go on a little, and includes something that sets the entry in time like a current event. He ends with a haiku. He’s been doing this for decades. At the end of each year, he reviews the haiku, and pulls out his favorites, recopying them into a small chapbook that he gives to his wife as a Christmas gift. Eventually, he realized he had the makings of a book.

John Straley’s haiku practice takes on the “practice” of writing very directly in an Eastern philosophical way. The prescribed form—both in the journal writing, and in the subject matter and restricted syllables of haiku—allow for the creative freedom that comes from self-imposed limitations. He says haiku captures “everything on both sides of the poet’s eyes,” because the poet’s mind is open to the moment. He says though there are “no fancy words in haiku,” the poet is opening both eyes and senses, “letting the world in and your expression out.” Straley says that even though he’s been creating haiku for decades, he rarely strays from a 5-7-5 syllable form. Acknowledging that it’s an Americanized translation of the form, he notes that the strict, tiny structure works for him.

Summer is not exactly the best time for new habits in my world. The kids are out of school, we’re leaving town whenever we can, and trying to get outside whenever the sun makes an appearance, but on the days I make time to write, I try now to look back at my memories of the last twenty-four hours, to practice remembering a moment or two as vividly as possible. And sometimes, I end my entries with a haiku. The verbal puzzle wakes the part of my brain that loves wordplay.

There are as many kinds of writer’s habits as there are writers, and one of my favorite forms of procrastination is reading about them (The Paris Review’s decades and decades of interviews with writers are free on their web site, and it is a rabbit hole perfect to save for when you have a writing deadline). Like David Sedaris, John Straley’s daily writing is a practice in seeing. His daily, intentional crafting of a tiny poem is one way of setting his brain towards good writing. For both writers, their habits bore fruit beyond the benefits of practice in haiku and journal snippets ripe and ready to harvest for their new books.

Amy O’Neill Houck lives in Douglas, Alaska and serves on the 49 Writers Board of Directors.

The Northern Pen Young Writers’ Conference

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An exciting new opportunity for young Alaskan writers and composers is underway! The Northern Pen Conference of Prose and Music is currently accepting students for our inaugural session. Our goal is to combine music and prose in order to better understand people’s relationship to place. Award-winning author Matthew Dickerson will guide our young writers, and Anchorage composer Michael Dickerson will work with our developing musicians. We are also honored to include Hollis Mickey as our interdisciplinary guest artist. She will coach our students through the process of defining and owning their artistic vision, and will offer insight into the challenge of collaborating across artistic media.

Our conference will take place on October 12-15, 2017 in Sutton, Alaska, where students will enjoy direct contact with the beautiful natural environment of Alaska. They will participate in workshops, spend time writing in response to their environment, and benefit from personalized faculty feedback. Our conference will culminate in a presentation of their collaborative work, and will be followed up by opportunities to share student work at the Anchorage Museum and at the arts organization OutNorth.

~ Michael Dickerson

Applications accepted until September 10. For more information, or to reserve your place, please see our website www.thenorthernpen.com, or email Michael Dickerson at michaelcd7@gmail.com.

The conference occurs in the Matanuska Valley between the Chugach and Talkeetna Mountains, just minutes away from spectacular Matanuska Glacier.

 

Deb Vanasse | Know It All

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Eudora Welty

It’s a crazy hypothetical, but let’s say you could only give one piece of writing advice, and the advice had to be expressed in a single sentence.

Based on where we are along our trajectories as writers, each of us would choose differently. In large part because of the developmental editing assistance I render, my current choice is this pithy line from Eudora Welty:

“You must know all, then not tell it all, or not tell too much at once.”

Like never, all is an absolute, and absolutes are best avoided unless you’re speaking for effect, as Welty is here. We never really know all about anything.  Besides, as E.L. Doctorow said, writing is like driving at night in the fog. You only see as far as the headlights, but you keep looking and driving and eventually you’ll make the whole trip.

Layer Welty’s advice into Doctorow’s metaphor, and you get this: You must know all within the space illuminated by the headlights. Know all the details that make up the scene, all the sights and sounds and smells, zoomed in and zoomed out. Know the characters—who they are, what they think, what they feel, where they’ve been, where they’re headed, what they know about themselves, what they’ve yet to discover, their triumphs, their failures, their motives, their potential, their misbeliefs. Know how one thing leads to the other, the chain of causes and effects on which stories rely.

But you never tell all you know. You withhold. Understanding that readers long to engage in your story, you offer sufficient detail to ground them, to ensure they suspend disbelief. The rest you parcel out strategically, knowing that readers need tension to keep them engaged. You drop breadcrumbs that show them the way.

Some of what you know never makes it onto the page. But you still need to know it, because knowing makes your story real and full and true. Much of revision involves sifting through what to tell and when. The more you write, the more you develop instincts for knowing and telling. Even so, there’s always more to discover. You think you’re finished, and then you see what you missed. Sometimes you’ll add to what you’ve told—and always, the placement is strategic. Sometimes you’ll just know it for yourself.

Co-founder of 49 Writers and founder of the independent authors cooperative Running Fox Books, Deb Vanasse has authored seventeen books. Among the most recent are Write Your Best Book, a practical guide to writing books that rise above the rest; Cold Spell, a novel that “captures the harsh beauty of the terrain as well as the strain of self-doubt and complicated family bonds”; and the “deeply researched and richly imagined” biography  Wealth Woman. After thirty-six years in Alaska, she now lives on the north coast of Oregon.

Spotlight on Alaska Books | Upon this Rock by David Marusek

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IT WOULD BE hard to return to sleep this late in the day, but Poppy yawned and turned over to try anyway.

No dice. First the front door slammed, and someone stomped their boots on the mat. Then there was a lot of urgent-sounding jibber-jabber through the wall. Then the door slammed again. More boot stomping, more jibber-jabber. Finally, the hallway floorboards creaked, and the bedroom door inched open.

“Lord?” It was his firstborn, Adam.

“Speak.”

“Uh, we have a problem.”

“Wait till I get up. Then you’ll have two problems.”

“Yes, lord. Sorry. Uh, Proverbs killed a moose.”

“Praise the Lord.”

“Amen. Except he shot it in the field.”

“Even better. It was delivered to our door.”

“Yes, lord, except — except that today is Twosday.”

“So what if it is?”

“Twosday, lord — Mail Day.”

At last the fog of sleep lifted from Poppy’s brain. Poaching a moose so near the house on Mail Day was not a good plan. “Hand me my britches.”

UPON THIS ROCK: Book 1 — First Contact by David Marusek

An epic new science fiction series about faith, family, and alien invasion in bush Alaska.

When a shooting star plunges through the atmosphere and touches down in the Alaska wilderness, only two earthlings are present to witness the event. But they perceive two utterly different realities. What park ranger Jace Kuliak sees is a UFO and the arrival of a dangerous alien species from beyond the solar system. What Poppy Prophecy sees is the star called Wormwood, as recorded in Scripture, and the arrival of an archangel of the Apocalypse.

The thing is — they’re both sorta right.

Poppy Prophecy is the despotic patriarch of a large End-Times prepper family that is busily converting a depleted copper mine into its own private doomsday bunker. Their copper mine is a century-old relic from territorial days when East Coast robber barons ruled Alaska and plundered its mineral wealth. Today the abandoned mine sits in the middle of the largest, wildest, most majestic national park in the United States. But Poppy isn’t impressed by mere earthly beauty, and he doesn’t mind bulldozing federal land when it suits his purposes.

Backcountry Ranger Jace Kuliak does mind, and he and fellow rangers confront the fundamentalist family in an armed standoff over the construction of an illegal airstrip. It doesn’t help matters when Ranger Kuliak falls hopelessly in love with Poppy’s second daughter, the lovely, innocent, and totally clueless Deuteronomy.

An uneasy truce between the Prophecys and the park service is shattered when the falling star lands in their backyard and is claimed by both sides. What is it? Who is it? Better yet, of all the pit stops on all the planets in all the galaxies, why did the Visitor choose this particular rock to screw with?

“Alaska. Aliens. The Anti-Christ. AWESOME! Marusek is in full form with this curveball tale about ETs, extremists, snowmobile chases and the meaning of life. Upon This Rock feels like The Puppet Masters crossed with Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy. It’s snarky, mind-blowing, wild and fun. Thoroughly engrossing.”
—Jeff Carlson, international bestselling author of The Frozen Sky

Author David Marusek writes science fiction in a cabin in Fairbanks, Alaska. His work has appeared in Playboy, Nature, MIT Technology Review, Asimov’s, and other periodicals and anthologies and has been translated into ten languages. According to Publisher’s Weekly, “Marusek’s writing is ferociously smart, simultaneously horrific and funny, as he forces readers to stretch their imaginations and sympathies.” His two novels and clutch of short stories have earned him numerous award nominations and have won the Theodore Sturgeon and Endeavour awards. “. . . Marusek could be the one sci-fi writer in a million with the potential to make an increasingly indifferent audience care about the genre again . . .”—New York Times Book Review. “Marusek is one of the relatively few contemporary sf writers who seems deeply responsive to the contemporary world”—Encyclopedia of Science Fiction

Upon This Rock is published by A Stack of Firewood Press and is available in paperback and ebook editions.

Author’s websitePaperback edition | Ebook edition